Louth Museum

Energy Case Studies > Louth Museum

    Background

    Through the Energy Efficiency and Micro Generation project the museum’s existing halogen display lighting was replaced with energy efficient LED equivalents to reduce electricity consumption and help combat heat build-up within the exhibition spaces attributed to the halogen lighting.

    In addition, due to the intermittent occupancy patterns of the museum, occupancy sensors were also installed to allow the exhibit lighting to automatically power off when the exhibition space is unoccupied.

    Whilst aiming to reduce the energy demand associated with the museum display lighting the project also utilized the building’s large area of south-facing roof; by installing an array of solar photovoltaic (PV) panels to provide on-site generated green electricity.

    If successful, it is hoped the installations of the energy efficient lighting, coupled with the micro-generation technologies will render significant financial savings due to the reduction of electricity used, and will also achieve substantial environmental benefits, through a sizable reduction in carbon emissions from the building.

    Another feature of the exemplar buildings will be a visitor experience display screen in the building foyer which, through the monitoring of the building’s energy meters, will allow visitors to see a real-time display of the building’s energy performance, comparing live data with historical energy consumption and carbon emissions data.

    Through the Energy Efficiency and Micro-Generation Project it is proposed to replace the existing halogen lighting in the museum exhibition spaces with energy efficient LED lighting.

    This lighting upgrade, coupled with the installation of infra-red occupancy detectors, will result in a reduction in the lighting load by approximately 70% and through the installation of solar photovoltaic panels, will allow the museum building to generate sufficient green electricity to power the museum’s display lighting.

    The proposed exemplar works will include the installation of approximately 45m2 of photovoltaic (PV) panels with a peak output of 9kWe(p), combined with the replacement of over 200 halogen spot lights with more energy efficient LED versions controlled by occupancy sensors at the entrance to each exhibition space.

    Overheating of the building was a major concern, causing occupants discomfort particularly during summer months. This over-heating issue can be primarily attributed to the numerous halogen spot lights illuminating the various exhibits. In addition, due to the intermittent occupancy patterns of the exhibition spaces, display lighting was often on when not required. This automatic switching on display lighting will help reduce energy consumption even further. Furthermore, the lifecycle of the proposed LED lighting is approximately 10 times that of the exiting lighting and will require less frequent maintenance.

    Another feature of the exemplar buildings is a visitor experience display screen in the building foyer which, through the monitoring of the building’s energy meters, allows visitors to see a real-time display of the building’s energy performance, comparing live data with historical energy consumption and carbon emissions data.

    As part of the Energy Efficiency and Micro-Generation Project works it is anticipated that a target of 31% reduction in energy consumption and 51% reduction in carbon emissions will be achieved.

    Work Completed

    Through the Energy Efficiency and Micro Generation project the museum’s existing halogen display lighting was replaced with energy efficient LED equivalents to reduce electricity consumption and help combat heat build-up within the exhibition spaces attributed to the halogen lighting.

    In addition, due to the intermittent occupancy patterns of the museum, occupancy sensors were also installed to allow the exhibit lighting to automatically power off when the exhibition space is unoccupied.

    Whilst aiming to reduce the energy demand associated with the museum display lighting the project also utilized the building’s large area of south-facing roof; by installing an array of solar photovoltaic (PV) panels to provide on-site generated green electricity.
    If successful, it is hoped the installations of the energy efficient lighting, coupled with the micro-generation technologies will render significant financial savings due to the reduction of electricity used, and will also achieve substantial environmental benefits, through a sizable reduction in carbon emissions from the building.

    Another feature of the exemplar buildings will be a visitor experience display screen in the building foyer which, through the monitoring of the building’s energy meters, will allow visitors to see a real-time display of the building’s energy performance, comparing live data with historical energy consumption and carbon emissions data.

    Through the Energy Efficiency and Micro-Generation Project it is proposed to replace the existing halogen lighting in the museum exhibition spaces with energy efficient LED lighting.

    This lighting upgrade, coupled with the installation of infra-red occupancy detectors, will result in a reduction in the lighting load by approximately 70% and through the installation of solar photovoltaic panels, will allow the museum building to generate sufficient green electricity to power the museum’s display lighting.

    The proposed exemplar works will include the installation of approximately 45m2 of photovoltaic (PV) panels with a peak output of 9kWe(p), combined with the replacement of over 200 halogen spot lights with more energy efficient LED versions controlled by occupancy sensors at the entrance to each exhibition space.

    Overheating of the building was a major concern, causing occupants discomfort particularly during summer months. This over-heating issue can be primarily attributed to the numerous halogen spot lights illuminating the various exhibits. In addition, due to the intermittent occupancy patterns of the exhibition spaces, display lighting was often on when not required. This automatic switching on display lighting will help reduce energy consumption even further. Furthermore, the lifecycle of the proposed LED lighting is approximately 10 times that of the exiting lighting and will require less frequent maintenance.

    Another feature of the exemplar buildings is a visitor experience display screen in the building foyer which, through the monitoring of the building’s energy meters, allows visitors to see a real-time display of the building’s energy performance, comparing live data with historical energy consumption and carbon emissions data.

    As part of the Energy Efficiency and Micro-Generation Project works it is anticipated that a target of 31% reduction in energy consumption and 51% reduction in carbon emissions will be achieved.

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